In the Media

  • 11 Jun

    2014 Rosés

    The Underground Wine Letter

    The 2014 Rosés are now beginning to arrive in full force. This will continue well into the summer. As I reported in early trade tasting articles on the 2014 rosés (to read those articles click here), the 2014 rosés seem particulary bright and crisp. Below are notes on some of the rosés that are favorites year in and year out. They include a new favorite rosé from Austria, the always stunning Clos de Beylesse from Côtes de Provence that comes in the absolutely drop dead gorgeous blue bottle as well as rosés from 2 of the best importers of rosé in the US : Hand Picked Selections (click here to visit the website) and Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant (click here to visit the website).
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    11 Jun

    What is Pink, Dry, and Affordable?

    Examiner.com

    Here are a few things that French rose wines are not: they are not a specific grape or region and wines are not colored with artificial dyes. (But, you knew the last one.)

    According to wineintro.com, rose is a category like red or white and named for the pale red shade of the wine. All grapes are white on the inside and to make a rose the winemaker allows the red skins to “sit” on the juice for only a short time.
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    10 Jun

    Vines & Wines: Dry Rosés are Becoming the Rage

    Richmond Time-Dispatch

    Rosé wines come in all colors — salmon to pink to bright red. They also come in all kinds of bottle shapes and are made from almost every red grape you can think of.


    But a singular thinking is starting to take place. Dry rosés are the way to go.


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  • 08 Jun

    Explore French Rosé Wines Without a Passport

    Examiner.com

    For centuries the French wine wizards of Provence have been crafting exceptionally tantalizing rose wines from the world’s most prestigious wine region.

    Here’s a short refresher on the winemaking technique: Rose is made from red grapes (the same as red wines) and get their color and character from limited time – a few hours – of skin contact with the colorless grape juice.


    The resulting wine is made to drink now with a long list of dishes. All four are available in the U.S. for around $15.
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    05 Jun

    Rosé's Magical Allure

    Wine Enthusiast

    Beyond its unique hue there’s something special about rosé—a quality you can’t see, smell or touch—that distinguishes it from other wine.
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    04 Jun

    Wines of Summer

    Yesterday's Island

    The benchmark for dry rosés originates from the Provence region located in Southern France. This region has been focusing on rosé wine production for centuries. What makes this area stand out as the gold star standard is partly due to their heritage of winemaking, their ideal location on the Mediterranean coast, and also their unwavering production standards. Provence is home to some of France’s oldest vineyards and is the world’s largest wine region specializing in dry rosé. Therefore, a culture has been created around this wine and long-established traditions have maintained the quality of the product produced.
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